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IC’s call for tribunal to investigate Warner still in Pres’ hands

Published: 
Sunday, May 31, 2015

The Integrity Commission has been requesting a President-appointed tribunal to investigate Independent Liberal Party leader Jack Warner since late last year. 

The Sunday Guardian learned that since 2014, the Integrity Commission under its former chairman, Ken Gordon, wrote to President Anthony Carmona requesting that he appoint a tribunal to make a determination on Warner.

One Integrity Commission insider, speaking on the condition of anonymity yesterday, said the investigation stemmed from the 2013 Concacaf Committee findings by Sir David Simmons.

“The investigations had gotten to the point where he (Warner) could not answer questions posed to him,” the insider said.

He said the commission then wrote the request to the President after its own investigation hit a snag.

“But he has been sitting on that for over a year, despite three reminders being sent to him,” he said.

“It was clear there were a number of things hidden or not easily understood,” the insider said.

When contacted on the matter, Warner would only describe the revelation as “old news.”

In April 2013 Simmons found that Warner and Chuck Blazer, the former general secretary of Concacaf, committed “underhanded dealings and fraud” in handling the affairs of the regional football body. 

Simmons disclosed that Warner and Blazer used their offices for personal gain.

Simmons had produced a 113-page report into Concacaf’s finances during Warner’s tenure which included investigations into Warner’s links to the following:

• Ownership of the US$25.9 million Dr Joao Havelange Centre of Excellence at Macoya 

• An apartment in Trump Plaza

• Whereabouts of funds generated from a contract between Concacaf and UMBRO—an English sportswear and football equipment supplier based in Manchester, England 

• Two apartments in Miami and a Hummer, a luxury SUV

• Employment contract of former general secretary Blazer and the provisions of that contract

• Concacaf’s failure to pay taxes and file tax returns

• Completeness and accuracy of Concacaf’s finances and audits.

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